Jun 30, 2022  
2021-22 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2021-22 Undergraduate Bulletin Archived

General Agriculture, BSAG


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Areas of study for the general agriculture major include:

Agribusiness

The area of agribusiness involves the manufacture and distribution of agricultural supplies; production operations on the farm; and the storage, processing and distribution of farm commodities. The study of agribusiness focuses on integrating technical knowledge with economic theory for decision making concerning the use of scarce productive resources to produce food and fiber for distribution to society.

Agricultural Communications

Agricultural communications is a combination of agriculture and communication courses designed to prepare students to become advocates and effective communicators for the agriculture industry. Students will develop skills in writing, photojournalism, public relations, web and social media content and other forms of media as they relate to modern agricultural industries.

Agricultural Development Production

Agricultural development production is a course of study designed to prepare the student for a career in teaching, extension or with agricultural service agencies whose purpose is to disseminate information related to the industry of agriculture. Special emphasis will be placed on communication skills and effective teaching strategies.

Agricultural Engineering Technology

Agricultural engineering technology is a course of study designed to prepare the student for a career in the management of agricultural systems, including the design and marketing of agricultural machinery, agricultural structures and agricultural environments.

Agricultural Engineering Technology Teaching

Agricultural engineering technology teaching is equivalent to the agricultural engineering technology concentration with the addition of the required teaching certification courses. Graduates will be prepared to teach agricultural mechanics in a high school agricultural science program.

Animal Science

The field of animal science provides exciting and challenging opportunities for graduates desiring to pursue careers in animal production, animal health or health services, feed formulation and manufacturing, processing/further processing and the marketing of animals and animal products. Specialty areas include beef cattle science, poultry science, swine production, equine science and pre-veterinary medicine.

Equine Science

Equine science is a branch of animal science that focuses on the equine species. Courses focus on the production, riding, training and reproduction of equine. Graduates are prepared to enter the equine industry.

Horticulture

Horticulture is the science, business and art of growing and marketing fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamental plants. Horticulture includes site planning and preparation, seed and vegetative propagation, plant growth and development, harvest, distribution, marketing, utilization and human issues associated with a wide diversity of crops for nutrition, beauty and utility. An emphasis in turfgrass is available as a part of the major in horticulture.

Poultry Science

Poultry science is a course of study designed to prepare the student for a challenging career in the poultry industry. The curriculum includes all aspects of live production, waste management, computer technology, nutrition and product processing. Upon completion of the course requirements, a student will be prepared for entry-level management positions within the industry.

Pre-Veterinary

Pre-veterinary prepares students to enter a school of veterinary medicine to pursue a terminal degree and become a licensed veterinarian. Students focus on the prerequisites required to apply to vet school, as well as small and large animal agricultural production.

Degree Requirements

University Core Curriculum Requirements


A. Communication


B. Mathematics


C. Life and Physical Sciences


D. Language, Philosophy and Culture


E. Creative Arts


F. American History


G. Government/Political Sciences


H. Social and Behavioral Sciences


I. Component Area Option


Foundation of Knowledge


The Foundation of Knowledge coursework will be listed under each concentration.

For Agribusiness


For Agricultural Communications


For Agricultural Engineering Technology


For Animal Science and Equine Science


For Horticulture


General Agriculture Major


The General Agriculture, Major  will consist of a 19 hour core and one of the following concentrations:

  • Agribusiness
  • Agricultural Communications
  • Agricultural Development Production
  • Agricultural Engineering Technology
  • Agricultural Engineering Technoloty Teaching
  • Animal Science
  • Equine Science
  • Horticulture
  • Poultry Science
  • Pre-Veterinary

Agriculture Development/Leadership Option


Three hours from:

General Agriculture Concentrations


Agribusiness


Agriculture Electives

Fourteen hours, at least six hours must be 3000-4000, from:

Minor

The General Business, Minor  is required for this concentration.

Agricultural Communications


Agricultural Engineering Technology


Agricultural Engineering Technology Teaching


Agriculture Electives

Two hours from any agriculture prefix, with advisor’s approval.

Professional Education Courses

Animal Science


Animal Science Electives

Fifteen hours, nine hours at 3000-4000 level, from:

Agriculture Electives

Six to nine hours of Agriculture electives, as advised. At least three hours must be advanced.

Equine Science


Horticulture


Poultry Science


Pre-Veterinary


General Electives


The student may be required to complete additional elective hours to complete the degree.

Degree Total Hours: 120


Grade Requirements


  • A grade of at least C in each first-year English course (ENGL 1301 , ENGL 1302 )
  • A C average in work completed in the major field
  • A C average in work completed in the minor field

The required averages are based on those SFA courses taken in each category that are included in the student’s official degree plan (CAPP). Transfer and advanced placement coursework are not included in GPA calculations.

In-Residence Requirement


Undergraduate Degree Programs

Undergraduate degrees require at least 25% semester credit hours completed in-residence.

Undergraduate degrees with 120 hours total degree program hours require a minimum of 30 advanced (upper level) in-residence semester credit hours. The in-residence hour requirement will be fulfilled as part of the individual discipline major, which includes as least 12 advanced in-residence semester credit hours. Minor requirements also may contribute to the total in-residence hours as at least six advanced in-residence semester credit hours are required. The balance of in-resident hours will be fulfilled through additional advanced semester credit hours and may include further major and minor coursework.

Undergraduate degrees with more than 120 total degree program hour requirements will ensure semester credit hours for the specific discipline include at least 25% of total semester credit hours in-residence.

View the In-Residence Requirement, Policy 6.15.

Texas Success Initiative Program


All students must satisfy provisions of the Texas Success Initiative program. See the TSI information  bulletin page.

Degree Map


The following is the recommended sequence of course completion for this degree.

Freshman Year


Fall


Spring


Sophomore Year


Fall


Spring


Junior Year


Fall


Spring


Senior Year


Fall


Spring


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